Food service jobs aren’t without risk

Whether working in a fast food environment or a fine dining restaurant, the food service industry can be challenging. Employees who cook, clean and serve often face high demands from both their boss and guests.

In the hustle and bustle of doing your job, there’s a chance that you may get hurt. Staying aware of daily hazards can help you avoid as many injuries as possible, although some are simply out of your control. If not for worker’s compensation, the costs of one injury could otherwise demolish your hard-earned savings.

Working with hot food and equipment creates the ever-present danger of suffering burn injuries. Burns could either occur instantly after contact with a hot pan or gradually in hot water while cleaning. Protective heat-resistant gloves and handles should be available if necessary. Coworkers must also be alert and careful when working near active grills or ovens.

In addition, floors of food establishments are frequently wet from spilled drinks or mopping. Servers who quickly carry trays of dishes might not see liquid on the floor – especially if nobody has placed a "wet floor" warning sign over the area. Slippery floors can easily lead to accidents with enough force to damage bones or the spine.

The majority of those who work in the food industry rarely receive competitive benefits, but worker’s compensation is one advantage that many South Carolina workers have automatically. If you aren’t sure whether your employer has insurance coverage for injured staff, you can look up the date of the accident and the business on the state’s online database. However, certain styles of employment are limited.

If you slip, trip, or suffer a burn at work, you need to act quickly. Tell your manager what happened and treat wounds immediately. In the days that follow, you can decide whether to pursue a claim.